Thursday, September 23, 2021

The Donkey and the Tiger

DONKEY AND TIGER

Ancient Wisdom
A Teaching Story
By
VIKRAM KARVE 

Here is a story from the Panchatantra:

There once lived, in a small village, a poor dhobi (a washerman). 

The dhobi had a donkey to carry heaps of clothes for washing to the ghat (riverbank) and back. 

Since the poor dhobi could not afford to properly feed his donkey every day, the donkey started to become weak and could not carry his load properly.


One day, the dhobi found the dead body of a tiger while he was collecting wood from the forest. 

The dhobi was very happy and thought, “I am lucky. I can skin the dead tiger and cover my donkey with the tiger’s skin and drive it into wheat farms where he will have plenty to graze. Once my donkey is covered with tiger skin, everyone will think that my donkey is a tiger. Thinking that he is a tiger, people will get scared and keep away from him. This way, my donkey will have plenty of food.” 

He acted on his plan. 


The dhobi would cover his donkey with tiger’s skin every evening.

Then, after dark, the donkey would go to the wheat farms every night.

The donkey would graze to his heart’s content till his stomach was full and return to his master’s house early in the morning. 

The hapless farmers watched helplessly as they were scared of confronting the “tiger”, especially after dark, in the eerie darkness in the night.

This went on for sometime. 

Soon the donkey became so strong and sturdy that he carried heavy loads effortlessly and the dhobi was very happy. 

One night, the dhobi’s donkey (in tiger’s skin) was happily grazing at the wheat farms. 

Suddenly the donkey heard the voice of a female donkey. It was a donkey mating call.


The donkey was so excited on hearing the mating call of a female donkey that he began to respond to it in ecstasy, braying loudly at full pitch.

The astounded farmers ran out of their huts and watched in amazement as they heard the “tiger” braying like a donkey instead of roaring like a tiger. 

Soon the truth dawned on them. 


This was no tiger. 

This creature was a donkey wearing a tiger’s skin who had been grazing merrily in their wheat farms and eating up their valuable crop.

The farmers decided to take revenge and teach this “tiger” a lesson.

So all the farmers attacked the dhobi’s donkey.


They severely beat the hapless donkey in tiger’s skin with sticks.

Soon the dhobi’s donkey collapsed in pain. 

His head was smashed and his bones were broken. 

A few hours later, the donkey died of his injuries.
_________

Moral of the Story:

A Donkey Should Not Act Like a Tiger.
Do not pretend to be what you are not. 
Be Yourself. 
If you are a donkey then behave like a donkey.

___________

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a spoof, satire, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Extract from my article CHICKENED OUT earlier posted first online by me Vikram Karve around 8 years ago in 2013 at url: https://karvediat.blogspot.com/2013/04/a-donkey-should-not-act-like-tiger.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.com/2021/02/a-donkey-should-not-act-like-tiger.html
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

“Chickened Out”

CHICKENED OUT

A Story for your Children, and for You too.
By
VIKRAM KARVE
 
There once was a chicken farmer who found an eagle’s egg. It was beautiful large egg.

He put it in the nest of his hen along with the other chicken eggs. 

That night the mother hen sat on the all the eggs, including the eagle egg and in due course an eaglet hatched along with a brood of chicks.

When the baby eagle opened his eyes for the first time it first saw the mother hen, thus identifying it the hen as his mother.

The young eagle grew up with all the other chickens. 

Whatever the chickens did, the eagle also did. 

He learned to cluck, cackle, scratch in the dirt for grits and worms.

The young eagle thought he was a chicken.

Since the chickens could only fly for a short distance, the eagle also learned to fly just over a short distance. He thought that was what he was supposed to do. So that was all that he thought he could do. And that was all he was able to do.

All his life he lived like a chicken. He scratched the earth for worms and insects. He clucked and cackled. And he would thrash his wings and fly a few feet into the air.

Years passed and the eagle grew very old.

One day the eagle saw a magnificent bird flying high above him. The old eagle looked up in awe as the majestic bird glided gracefully among the powerful wind currents, with scarcely a beat on his strong golden wings. 

He was very impressed and curious so he asked the hens around him, “Who is that magnificent creature who has so much power and grace and poetry in motion?

“That is the eagle, the king of the birds,” the hens told him, “He belongs to the sky and we belong to the earth because we are mere chickens.”
 
So the eagle lived and died a chicken because that is what he thought he was - yes, the eagle chickened out”! 
 
Moral of the story:

You are not what you actually are.
You are what you think you are.

___________

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a spoof, satire, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Extract from my article CHICKENED OUT earlier posted first online by me Vikram Karve 10 years ago in 2011 at url: http://karvediat.blogspot.com/2011/12/chicken-out.html and later reposted at url: http://karvediat.blogspot.com/2021/02/teaching-story-chickened-out.html
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

NCC Revamp Suggestions – Part 2 : Rejuvenating NCC Human Resources

NCC REVAMP SUGGESTIONS – PART 2

NATIONAL CADET CORPS (NCC)

HOW TO REVAMP NCC

Musings of Veteran Vikram Karve

_______

Continued from Part 1 – IS THERE A NEED TO REVAMP THE NCC…? 

URL: http://karvediat.blogspot.com/2021/09/does-ncc-need-revamp.html

_______

Part 2

Rejuvenating NCC Human Resources

_______

An organization – especially a military oriented organization like NCC – has three facets:

1. “Hardware” (Infrastructure)

2. “Software” (Management/Administrative System)

3. “Skinware” (Human Resource)

_______

In my opinion – the weakest aspect of the NCC is the “Skinware” (Human Resource)

If you are really serious about improving the NCC and motivating and empowering young NCC Cadets – my suggestions to rejuvenate the NCC “Skinware” are as follows:

1. Young motivated Army, Navy, Air Force Officers must be posted to NCC – all military officers posted to NCC Units must be below the age of 30 – in top physically fit condition, professionally savvy and full of “josh” – to bond with and inspire the young NCC Cadets.

2. Military Officers posted to NCC HQ must be below 45 years of age – and should be agile, full of zest and look physically fit – all officers and personnel posted to NCC must be in top Medical Category SHAPE1 (S1A1) – and – they must be professionally sound and highly motivated in order to be “role models” for young NCC cadets who are of impressionable age.

3. NCC must be treated as a “prestigious” appointment for bright career prospects at all levels. NCC must not be used as a “dumping ground” for Superseded Officers, Re-Employed Officers, Low Medical Category (LMC) Officers and “Unwanted” Officers – or a “Compassionate Grounds” or Pre-Retirement “Resettlement” Posting.

_______

Do you know how many Director Generals of NCC (DGNCC) have become Army Chiefs…?

If you look at the list of DGNCC since inception of NCC in 1948 – you will observe that only one – the first DGNCC Col GG Bewoor – became the Army Chief. And – he was a young Colonel when he was DGNCC.

After 1948 – though the rank of DGNCC has been continuously upgraded – and is now held by a Lieutenant General – not a single DGNCC has become an Army Chief (probably not even an Army Commander). This speaks volumes of the importance given to NCC.

At all levels – barring a few exceptions – a posting to NCC is usually considered “end of the road” as far as promotion prospects are concerned.

Also – NCC has 3 Wings – Army Navy and Air Force – therefore – it is appropriate to rotate the post of DGNCC between Army, Navy and Air Force – rather than keep it the exclusive preserve of the Army. There is saying that an organization is as good as its Top Leader – and – domination of a Tri-Service Organization like NCC by one service is not desirable. Rotating the post of DGNCC among Army, Navy and Air Force will impart a Tri-Service Flavor to the NCC and will promote better “Jointmanship” in the NCC which is especially relevant with the advent of Tri-Service Theatre Commands.

It may also be desirable to restructure and decentralize the NCC Organization to make it more dynamic and effective than the present top-heavy Delhi-Centric hierarchy.

I will elucidate my views on these aspects in Part 3 of this series.

To summarize – in my opinion – NCC does not require more money – NCC requires better people – as elucidated above in Part 2 – and systemic changes – which I will discuss in Part 3 of this series.

_________

FOOD FOR THOUGHT – RETURN ON “INVESTMENT” (ROI)

Dear Reader – please ruminate on these two questions:

1. What “ROI” does the government expect from NCC…?

2. What “ROI” do NCC Cadets expect from NCC…?

The two principal stakeholders who “invest” in the NCC are the government and youth who join NCC (cadets).

NCC is funded by taxpayers’ money – and all citizens pay taxes in some form or the other – so – the term “government” includes citizens as well.

On the other hand – youth who join the NCC as cadets “invest” their time.

What Return on Investment (ROI) do they expect from NCC…?

Think about it – Dear Readers – and – do comment and let us know your views.

We will discuss this aspect too in a subsequent post in this series.

In short:

Is NCC giving “a bang for the buck”…?

_________

VIKRAM KARVE

Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a fictional spoof, satire, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

 

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Sting in the Tail

STING IN THE TAIL – A Hot Love Story

Fiction Short Story
By
VIKRAM KARVE

From my Creative Writing Archives:

For old-times’ sake, here is a rather amateurish story I wrote long ago, around 30 years ago, in the 1990s, suitably abridged and revised.

Do tell me if you like the story...


STING IN THE TAIL 
A Hot Love Story by Vikram Karve 

_________
       
I shouted angrily at Shalini:

“I am an uncomplicated and transparent man. 

I have no taste for sham, tact or pretension. 

Never do I feel it necessary to be guarded, or to conceal, or to try to impress, to feel tense, to watch my words or actions, to suppress or repress my emotions. 

I express my emotions spontaneously and overtly. 

I can’t fake my emotions for the sake of so-called social graces. 

If this – according to your stupid mother-in-law  is crude, uncultured and unrefined behaviour – so be it. 

I don’t give a tinker’s damn...” 

I said these words angrily to Shalini. 

_________
         
I saw tears start in Shalini’s eyes  and I was instantly sorry. 

She suddenly looked small, weak and vulnerable  her defences shattered. 

I looked at her and felt a strange attraction towards her. 

Her very powerlessness and vulnerability were the essence of her sex appeal.
         
“No wonder he is such a loser and failure...” taunted Shalini’s mother-in-law. 

Shalini’s mother-in-law looked at my wife – and she said to my wife: 

“You must teach your husband some manners if you want him to go up in life. Look at my son. He knows the ways of the world. He is so soft-spoken and refined.”
         
The comparison was a doubly bitter pill for me to swallow.

While I was going through a bad patch in my career  Shalini’s husband was doing really well in the corporate sector – as an upwardly mobile executive in a top MNC.
         
I walked out of my house and sat down on a bench in the nearby park. 

I lit a cigarette and closed my eyes trying to calm down.

The train of my thoughts ran on. 

It was mainly my wife’s fault. 

She was too good natured

It was one of those invitations which she makes so readily and spontaneously  and then regrets later.

Shalini’s flat was being renovated  and my wife had invited them over to our house to stay for a month.

And today was just the first day.
         
Though we stayed in the same town  I did not visit Shalini often. 

She stayed with her mother-in-law. 

Her husband was away on tour most of the time. 

I did not get along with them. 

There was a mismatch in our sense of values. 

I hated their patronizing attitude, ingratiating manner, sweet-talk and double standards. 

Shalini’s mother-in-law was the worst of them all. 

She was always giving me unsolicited advice and trying to make me conform to her perception of ideal behaviour.

But I refused to be stereotyped. 

I was happy to be myself  with all my so-called faults and frailties.

I valued my originality  my own uniqueness.

I was not an imitator or a clone.

And now  this wily old woman – Shalini’s mother-in-law – she had the temerity to instigate my wife against me.

And that too – she was doing this in my own house.
         
I saw Shalini walking towards me. 

She had no personality of her own. 

The only thing she did was hang around her mother-in-law and nod her head in agreement.

All the time – Shalini flattered her mother-in-law  and they indulged in mutual admiration sessions – the “ideal” daughter-in-law  and the “ideal” mother-in-law.

It was disgusting. 

The old woman had probably sent Shalini to me to give me a moral lecture.

They had succeeded in brainwashing my wife. 

I was the only one remaining. 

I was not going to give them the satisfaction of toeing their line and conforming to their views. 
         
Before Shalini could speak  I said to her: 

“Sit down. Have you got a piece of paper...?”
         
She opened her purse  and she gave me a small pocket-diary.
______

I took out my pen and wrote: 

“A servile status and a vicarious life  so typical of a domesticated lonely wife...”
______
         
Shalini read the words and she gave me a glance that could have meant anything.

I was surprised that she was not offended.

She put the pocket-book in her purse and she got up to leave.
______

I delivered my parting shot and said to Shalini: 

“She who trims herself to suit everybody will soon whittle herself away...”
______
         
As Shalini walked away  I watched the subtle, sensual rhythm of her hips. 

I felt aroused. 

I laughed to myself. 

There was no point in chasing rainbows. 

What I needed now was a good stiff drink.

So – I went across to my club – and had a few stiff drinks.
         
I returned home around midnight.

I was not drunk  but I was feeling good.

I opened the door with the spare key that I always carried in my pocket.

It was dark inside the house.

I did not switch on the lights. 

There was no point in disturbing everybody.

I felt like having a smoke  so I tiptoed towards the balcony.

As I negotiated my way in the darkness  I could sense that someone was following me.

I guessed who she was.

I stopped in tracks.

I turned around.

Shalini put her arms around me  and she held me in a passionate embrace.

I tried to restrain myself  but I had not bargained for the sheer sensual power of the encounter. 

Shalini was radiating an extraordinary sensuousness of a degree I had never experienced before.

I caught her hair  I pulled her face towards me – and we were engulfed in a wave of burning passion...
_________

Suddenly  someone switched on the lights.
        
I disengaged from Shalini  and I looked at my wife. 

“Don’t be late next time...” I said to my wife, tongue-in-check. 

Shalini’s mother-in-law looked at us  dumbstruck and stunned.
         
My wife walked up to Shalini and gave her a tight slap. 

My wife was very angry. 

After all  Shalini was her best friend.
         
I never saw Shalini again. 

But I did come across her mother-in-law once in the market. 

I cheerfully waved out to Shalini’s mother-in-law  but she scrupulously avoided my glance  and she walked away.
___________

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
This story is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)

This story STING IN THE TAIL written by me Vikram Karve 30 years ago in 1990 and posted online earlier in my various creative writing blogs including at urlshttp://karvediat.blogspot.in/2011/01/sting-in-tail-short-fiction-love-story.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2015/06/sting-in-tail-hot-love-story.html and http://karvediat.blogspot.com/2017/08/sunday-fiction-sting-in-tail.html etc 

© vikram karve., all rights reserved.